My Etsy Shop

Thursday, January 16, 2014

Human Power

Early morning of January 17th, 1995, that was when I was woken up by a huge earthquake that struck Hanshin, south west part of Hyogo prefecture through Osaka, and Kyoto Japan.
I was sleeping in a room with a big Butsudan, a Japanese wooden shrine like cabinet, next to me.
When the earthquake started, the cabinet doors were opened so everything that was inside of Butsudan started falling over my futon, underneath of which I was sleeping.
Luckily the Butsudan itself did not fall on me, which could have and if it had, I would have been seriously injured. My parents immediately came out of the bedroom and made sure everyone was okay.  It was still dark outside, and it was cold January. 
The earthquake was measured Mj7.3
The focus was from northern part of Awaji island, near the big city of Kobe in Hyogo prefecture.
I was in elementary school, and I remember going to school that day just like a normal day except the street was quiet and there were broken glass, store signs and other things fell on the street.
Everyone was confused.  Our teacher made sure everyone was okay but she didn't know what we were supposed to do.  City of Osaka shut down all the schools that day.  We were told to go home for the possible aftershocks and stay inside to be safe.

Fortunately, the part of my city damage was minimum but the rest of Hyogo prefecture was a complete devastation.
TV kept showing the city of Kobe, surrounded by black smoke from the fire.
I remember the newscaster said if the earthquake had happened little later, during the rush hour, there would have been more people killed.  But I couldn't find that comment any help to make me feel relieved watching the burning city with thousands of people still underneath of these corrupted houses and buildings.

http://www.city.kobe.lg.jp/safety/hanshinawaji/data/photo/img/nadaku.JPG http://www.city.kobe.lg.jp/safety/hanshinawaji/data/photo/img/hyougoku.JPG
images: http://www.city.kobe.lg.jp/safety/hanshinawaji/data/photo/img/hyougoku.JPG

Our local elementary school I went to was small; each grade probably didn't even have more than a hundred students.
Just like other schools in Osaka did, our school accepted students from Kobe whose schools were destroyed by the earthquake so I remember having new classmates for a while.

 http://www.city.kobe.lg.jp/safety/hanshinawaji/data/photo/img/minato01.JPG
People trying to get on a ship to Osaka
image: http://www.city.kobe.lg.jp/safety/hanshinawaji/data/photo/img/minato01.JPG

I heard a lot of stories of people killed by the earthquake during those times.
My mother's acquaintance' son, who was a college student in Kobe, was studying that morning when the earthquake struck.  He was killed by a chimney from a public bath house next to his apartment fell over his room and crushed him.
Some were killed by the fire, and some were missing.
Everyday I heard people died, and died, and died.
It was not something easy to forget even as a child.

It's been 19 years since the Great Hanshin earthquake happened.
I've experienced many earthquakes in Japan growing up, even on my own wedding day, but still the Great Hanshin earthquake was the biggest earthquake I've ever experienced in my life.

Now I visit Kobe almost every time I go back to Japan.  One reason is because I have my thyroid annual check up required every year.
And other reason is because Kobe is absolutely beautiful. 
I truly hope foreigners will be able to know the city has much more than its famous Kobe beef.

 from a cable car looking over the city of Kobe

The city surrounded by mountains and harbors with foreign culture (check out Kitano area in Kobe-it's amazing) always reminds me of the quote by my favorite Japanese architect Tadao Ando;
"Charms of Kobe has been supported by, above all else, deep affection of its residents towards the city."
Obviously another reason for me to go to Kobe/Hyogo is to go see Ando's architecture.
He has done many charities to support the city of Kobe and Hyogo prefecture and has planted as many as 310,000 trees.
He truly understands the importance of the city to get its life back takes human power, that is not brought by money or economy but culture and community.

To commemorate those 6,434 who lost their lives,

05:46  01.17.1995


Thanks for reading.



 1995年1月17日早朝、大きな揺れを感じて私は目を覚ましました。
大 きな仏壇のある部屋で布団にくるまって寝ていた私の上に、仏壇の置物が次々落ちて来たのを覚えています。幸い仏壇は倒れてこなかったので怪我もなく、大事 には至りませんでした。私の両親がすぐに寝室から飛び出してきて家族の無事を確認すると、テレビをつけかじりつくようにニュースに見入っていました。外は まだ暗く、まだ少し眠かったのを覚えています。
小学生だった私はその日、一応登校しましたが、結局余震にも備え、大阪市の学校全て休校となったので先生やクラスメートに会ったあと下校させられました。
皆少し混乱していて、そわそわと落ち着きが無かったように思います。
道路にはガラス片や、看板が落ちていたりしていて人通りも少なく、車も走っていなかったのでやっぱり日常とは何かが違っていました。
一学年百人足らずの小さな学校に通っていたので集団下校になりました。
幸い、私の住んでいた大阪市は深刻な損害は受けずにすみましたが、テレビから映される神戸の状況はまるで地獄絵のようで、被害の大きさが見てとれました。
ニュースキャスターが、もしもラッシュアワーにこの地震が 起きていた場合、被害は更に深刻であったに違いない、とコメントしていたのですが、焼け落ちる街を目の前にしてそのコメントは慰めにも思えませんでした。
今もこの建物の下に何千もの人が下敷きになっているんだと思うといたたまれない気持ちになりました。
http://www.city.kobe.lg.jp/safety/hanshinawaji/data/photo/img/minato02.jpghttp://www.city.kobe.lg.jp/safety/hanshinawaji/data/photo/img/nagataku.JPG

写真 http://www.city.kobe.lg.jp/safety/hanshinawaji/data/photo/img/minato02.jpg

私の学校も他の大阪の学校同様、被災した神戸からの生徒を迎え入れる事になりました。
 http://www.city.kobe.lg.jp/safety/hanshinawaji/data/photo/img/minato01.JPG
大阪行きの船を待つ人々
 image: http://www.city.kobe.lg.jp/safety/hanshinawaji/data/photo/img/minato01.JPG
その間も沢山の悲しいニュースや、話を聞きました。
母の知人の息子さんは当時神戸に下宿していて、その朝は勉強していたところに
隣の銭湯の煙突が倒れてきた下敷きになって亡くなられたそうです。
そんな風に、何処へ行っても、テレビを見ても、誰が死んだ、どうやって死んだ、死んだ、見つからない、行方不明、
子供ながらに忘れづらい事ばかりの連続でした。

 あれから19年経ちます。日本で生まれ育ったので地震はこれまでも沢山経験してきましたが(自分の結婚式の日迄早朝に地震に襲われた位)あれ程大きかった地震は未だかつて経験がありません。

神戸には日本に帰国する度、毎年訪れています。理由のひとつは自分の甲状腺の検診がある病院が神戸にあるからですが、 それ以上に神戸が美しい街だからです。


”神戸の魅力は、何よりも住民たちの街に対する深い愛情によって支えられている。”
山と港に囲まれて、外国の文化と調和された私の大好きな北野のエリア等、今でこそ完全に復興しましたが三宮等、訪れる度に私の尊敬する建築家、安藤忠雄先生のことばが頭によぎります。もちろん彼の建築を見るために訪れる事も理由のひとつです。
安藤先生のいくつものチャリティーに、木を植える活動を続けているものがあります。
彼は、本当の意味で街が生き返る為に必要なのは人間力であり、重要なのはお金や経済ではなく、人間力とそれを培うコミュニティーであるという事を真に理解しているのです。
神戸牛だけが魅力でない事を外人のひとにもいつか分かっていただきたいですね。



震災によって失われた6434人のいのちに追悼の意を込めて。

05:46  01.17.1995

読んでくれたひと、ありがとう。

No comments:

Post a Comment